1700-tal: Nordic Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies https://septentrio.uit.no/index.php/1700 <p>Nordic Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies</p> Septentrio Academic Publishing en-US 1700-tal: Nordic Journal for Eighteenth-Century Studies 1652-4772 <p>Since 2013, 1700-tal publishes all content online, currently with a one-year delay after the printed version is distributed.<br><br>Copyright on any content in 1700-tal is retained by the author(s).<br><br>Authors grant 1700-tal a license to publish their contributions in print and online or any other medium and to identify itself as the original publisher.<br><br>Authors give 1700-tal the right to distribute their contributions freely under a Creative Commons Attribution License. This implies that any third party has the right to use the contribution freely, provided that its original author(s), citation details and publisher are identified.<br><br>For more information on the Creative Commons Attribution License see <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/">https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/</a>.<br><br>Authors have the right to self-archive their contribution in its final form (publisher’s PDF) as soon as the printed version has been distributed.</p> [Title page, Colophon, Table of Contents] https://septentrio.uit.no/index.php/1700/article/view/5114 My Hellsing Copyright (c) 2019 My Hellsing https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ 2019-11-18 2019-11-18 16 [1]–4 [1]–4 Redaktörernas förord https://septentrio.uit.no/index.php/1700/article/view/4877 My Hellsing Søren Peter Hansen Copyright (c) 2019 My Hellsing, Søren Peter Hansen http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ 2019-11-18 2019-11-18 16 5–6 5–6 10.7557/4.4877 Inledning: Haga, det skapade skimret över Gustaf III:s dagar https://septentrio.uit.no/index.php/1700/article/view/4878 My Hellsing Copyright (c) 2019 My Hellsing http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ 2019-11-18 2019-11-18 16 7–17 7–17 10.7557/4.4878 Authenticity on the silver screen https://septentrio.uit.no/index.php/1700/article/view/4879 <p>The three silent films 'Gustaf III och Bellman' (1908), 'En afton hos Gustaf III på Stockholms slott' and 'Två konungar' (1925) are illuminating examples of how the Gustavian period was reinvented, negotiated and visualized at the beginning of the twentieth century. In the article, object-based and visual analysis of the films, together with reception studies, are used to explore the production of period film and the strategies film directors developed in order to mediate a feeling of authenticity on screen. These strategies, based on a performative approach to authenticity, shared a number of similarities with professional art-historical practice at the turn of the twentieth century. The three case studies reveal not only how the Gustavian period was staged, but also the overlapping professional structures where filmmakers relied on specialists in the organization of material things, for example museum curators and art historians. Through their authority as experts they were able to help authenticate film productions and facilitate access for the film crew to historic sites. Likewise, the production of period films helped shape public history and influenced the management of heritage sites and museums, initiating reconstruction projects, for example.</p> Hedvig Mårdh Copyright (c) 2019 Hedvig Mårdh http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ 2019-11-18 2019-11-18 16 18–43 18–43 10.7557/4.4879 Ligning med ubekendte https://septentrio.uit.no/index.php/1700/article/view/4880 <p>Inaugurated in 1740, the majestic building of the new royal palace in Copenhagen would play a key role in the introduction of new stylistic waves over the next 50 years, until the palace sadly was destroyed by a devastating fire in 1794. As the title suggests, the disappearance of these interiors has left a serious lacuna in the understanding of the period’s art and architecture. All the famous architects and artists of the time worked in the palace and from this, the central monument of eighteenth-century Denmark, new ideas spread throughout the realm. A few drawings have survived, and together with the abundance of written sources, we can get a rather good impression of the character of these interiors, even to the point where it is possible to reconstruct quite a few of them in drawings. An example of this is the bedroom of the Crown Princess Marie Sophie Frederikke from 1790, from which there furthermore exist pieces of furniture and richly embroidered textiles (fig. 12-19). At the outset, the interiors of the palace were decorated in the early rococo style (figs. 4–7) by the young architects L. de Thurah and N. Eigtved, who both had recently been on long journeys in Europe, where they had studied the newest architecture. The French sculptor L.-A. Le Clerc was responsible for the design of all the ornamental work on the building, and since the ornaments played such a vital part in the concept of the whole style, Le Clerc came to play a key role in the interior design (fig. 9). Furthermore, the well-documented use of up-to-date literature about the latest developments in French architecture as well as direct artistic contact with the Court of Versailles, ensured that the interiors lived up to the standards of the time. The early variant of the classical revival, the Louis Seize, was introduced by the French architect N.-H. Jardin and later on developed further by his pupil, C.F. Harsdorff (fig. 8), aided by the talented architect and decorator C.F. Lillie. In this article, a part of the palace’s north wing is used as an example of the development of not only style and fashion, but also the different ways in which the rooms were used over the years.</p> <p>Inaugurated in 1740, the majestic building of the new royal palace in Copenhagen would play a key role in the introduction of new stylistic waves over the next 50 years, until the palace sadly was destroyed by a devastating fire in 1794. As the title suggests, the disappearance of these interiors has left a serious lacuna in the understanding of the period’s art and architecture. All the famous architects and artists of the time worked in the palace and from this, the central monument of eighteenth-century Denmark, new ideas spread throughout the realm. A few drawings have survived, and together with the abundance of written sources, we can get a rather good impression of the character of these interiors, even to the point where it is possible to reconstruct quite a few of them in drawings. An example of this is the bedroom of the Crown Princess Marie Sophie Frederikke from 1790, from which there furthermore exist pieces of furniture and richly embroidered textiles (fig. 12-19). At the outset, the interiors of the palace were decorated in the early rococo style (figs. 4–7) by the young architects L. de Thurah and N. Eigtved, who both had recently been on long journeys in Europe, where they had studied the newest architecture. The French sculptor L.-A. Le Clerc was responsible for the design of all the ornamental work on the building, and since the ornaments played such a vital part in the concept of the whole style, Le Clerc came to play a key role in the interior design (fig. 9). Furthermore, the well-documented use of up-to-date literature about the latest developments in French architecture as well as direct artistic contact with the Court of Versailles, ensured that the interiors lived up to the standards of the time. The early variant of the classical revival, the Louis Seize, was introduced by the French architect N.-H. Jardin and later on developed further by his pupil, C.F. Harsdorff (fig. 8), aided by the talented architect and decorator C.F. Lillie. In this article, a part of the palace’s north wing is used as an example of the development of not only style and fashion, but also the different ways in which the rooms were used over the years.</p> Kent Alstrup Copyright (c) 2019 Kent Alstrup http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ 2019-11-18 2019-11-18 16 44–78 44–78 10.7557/4.4880 Blickar och betydelser https://septentrio.uit.no/index.php/1700/article/view/4881 <p>During the years 1795–1866 the Swedish national art collection, today’s Nationalmuseum, was on display at the Royal Palace in Stockholm at what was known as Kongl. Museum. This museum consisted of two sculpture galleries adjacent to the palace garden Logården and a paintings gallery and a few more rooms on the second floor. While the sculpture galleries are well known as well as reconstructed in situ, there has been much less research on the display of paintings at the museum. In the cross disciplinary research project »Virtual Museum at the Royal Palace» we are using a digital 3D model to reconstruct the display of paintings in the so-called smaller gallery of the palace, as it was displayed during the period. The reconstruction deals with two different hangings of the gallery, in 1795 and c. 1843, made by the curators Carl Fredric Fredenheim and Lars Jacob von Röök respectively. Our preliminary findings show that, contrary to earlier claims, the two hangings are rather different and constructed on quite different ideologies of museum display, something that is possible to see thanks to the method of using digital 3D-models as a basis for analysis.</p> Johan Eriksson Steven Bachelder Masaki Hayashi Per Widén Copyright (c) 2019 Johan Eriksson, Steven Bachelder, Masaki Hayashi, Per Widén http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ 2019-11-18 2019-11-18 16 79–103 79–103 10.7557/4.4881 From country house to penthouse https://septentrio.uit.no/index.php/1700/article/view/4882 <p>In 2011 a new museum opened in Stockholm – Sven-Harry’s Art Museum – named after its initiator and funder, the building contractor Sven-Harry Karlsson. Besides a gallery for temporary exhibitions, the museum includes a permanent collection of art and applied art installed in a penthouse on top of the building. The installation is conceived as a full-scale replica of Karlsson’s former home in an eighteenth-century manor house. This article focuses on the reconstructed home and aims at situating it within a tradition of full-scale displays of architectural interiors – so-called period rooms – in Swedish cultural history museums. Since the start of the twentieth century, eighteenth-century architecture has had a central position in the Swedish cultural heritage. Sven-Harry’s replicated home, a small manor of the rococo era, fits perfectly into the national canon, which for a long time focused on the homes of the elites to illustrate development within the arts. Even though the recreated milieu in Sven-Harry’s museum depends on traditional museum practice, it is also typical of contemporary innovations. In the last few decades, even prestigious cultural history museums have utilized the periodroom format in unconventional ways, and the bold reconstruction of Sven-Harry’s home is clearly a representative of this trend.</p> Victor Edman Copyright (c) 2019 Viktor Edman http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ 2019-11-18 2019-11-18 16 104–124 104–124 10.7557/4.4882 Axel Hörstedt, Latin dissertations and disputations in the early modern Swedish gymnasium: A study of a Latin school tradition c. 1620–c. 1820 (University of Gothenburg, 2018), 502 pp. https://septentrio.uit.no/index.php/1700/article/view/4883 Elena Dahlberg Copyright (c) 2019 Elena Dahlberg http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ 2019-11-18 2019-11-18 16 125–128 125–128 10.7557/4.4883 Robert Oldach, Stadt und Festung Stralsund: Die schwedische militärpräsenz in Schwedisch-Pommern 1721–1807, Quellen und Studien aus den Landesarchiven Mecklenburg-Vorpommern 20 (Köln: Böhlau, 2018). 518 pp. https://septentrio.uit.no/index.php/1700/article/view/4884 Martin Almbjär Copyright (c) 2019 Martin Almbjär http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ 2019-11-18 2019-11-18 16 129–131 129–131 10.7557/4.4884 Mette Vårdal, Ligesaavel i Vadmel som i Fløiel. Uformelle relasjoner mellom embetsmenn, bønder og husmenn i Vågå ca. 1745–1844, doktoravhandling ved UiB (Bergen: Historisk-filosofisk fakultet, 2018). 341 pp. https://septentrio.uit.no/index.php/1700/article/view/4885 Marthe Hommerstad Copyright (c) 2019 Marthe Hommerstad http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ 2019-11-18 2019-11-18 16 132–137 132–137 10.7557/4.4885 Claus Bryld, Edmund Burke: Konservatismens profet (Aarhus: Aarhus universitetsforlag 2018). 276 pp. https://septentrio.uit.no/index.php/1700/article/view/4886 Mikkel Thorup Copyright (c) 2019 Mikkel Thorup http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ 2019-11-18 2019-11-18 16 138–140 138–140 10.7557/4.4886 Elise M. Dermineur, Gender and Politics in Eighteenth-Century Sweden: Queen Louisa Ulrika (1720–1782) (Abingdon & New York: Routledge, 2017). 253 pp. https://septentrio.uit.no/index.php/1700/article/view/4887 Johanna Ilmakunnas Copyright (c) 2019 Johanna Ilmakunnas http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ 2019-11-18 2019-11-18 16 141–144 141–144 10.7557/4.4887 Christina Holst Færch, Smædeskrifter, sladder og erotiske vers i 1700-tallet: Hans Nordrups forfatterskab – med et udvalg af hans digte (København: Museum Tusculanums Forlag, 2019). 416 pp. https://septentrio.uit.no/index.php/1700/article/view/4888 Simona Zetterberg Gjerlevsen Copyright (c) 2019 Simona Zetterberg Gjerlevsen http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ 2019-11-18 2019-11-18 16 145–148 145–148 10.7557/4.4888 Axel Kristinsson, Hnignun, hvaða hnignun? Goðsögnin um niðurlægingartímabilið í sögu Íslands [Decline, What Decline? The Myth of the Depressed Era in the History of Iceland]. (Reykjavík: Sögufélag 2018). 280 pp. https://septentrio.uit.no/index.php/1700/article/view/4890 Helgi Skúli Kjartansson Copyright (c) 2019 Helgi Skúli Kjartansson http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ 2019-11-18 2019-11-18 16 149–151 149–151 10.7557/4.4890 Leos Müller, Sveriges första globala århundrade: en 1700-talshistoria (Stockholm: Dialogos Förlag, 2018). 260 pp. https://septentrio.uit.no/index.php/1700/article/view/4891 Matthias Persson Copyright (c) 2019 Matthias Persson http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ 2019-11-18 2019-11-18 16 152–153 152–153 10.7557/4.4891 Aina Nøding, Claus Fasting: Dikter, journalist, opplysningspioner (Oslo: Scandinavian Academic Press, 2018). 440 pp. https://septentrio.uit.no/index.php/1700/article/view/4892 Per Pippin Aspaas Copyright (c) 2019 Per Pippin Aspaas http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ 2019-11-18 2019-11-18 16 154–156 154–156 10.7557/4.4892 Clemens Räthel, Wie viel Bart darf sein? Jüdische Figuren im skandinavischen Theater (Tübingen: Narr Francke Attempto Verlag, 2016). 388 pp. https://septentrio.uit.no/index.php/1700/article/view/4893 Bent Holm Copyright (c) 2019 Bent Holm http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ 2019-11-18 2019-11-18 16 157–160 157–160 10.7557/4.4893 Gunvor Simonsen, Slave Stories: Law, Representation, and Gender in the Danish West Indies (Aarhus: Aarhus University Press, 2017). 245 pp. https://septentrio.uit.no/index.php/1700/article/view/4894 Liv Helene Willumsen Copyright (c) 2019 Liv Helene Willumsen http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ 2019-11-18 2019-11-18 16 161–163 161–163 10.7557/4.4894 Kirsi Vainio-Korhonen, Musta-Maija ja Kirppu-Kaisa – Seksityöläiset 1800-luvun alun Suomessa [Black Maija and Flea Kaisa: Sex Workers at the Start of the Nineteenth Century in Finland] (Helsinki: SKS, 2018). 283 pp. https://septentrio.uit.no/index.php/1700/article/view/4895 Katariina Lehto Copyright (c) 2019 Katariina Lehto http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ 2019-11-18 2019-11-18 16 164–166 164–166 10.7557/4.4895 Þórunn Jarla Valdimarsdóttir, Skúli fógeti, faðir Reykjavíkur: Saga frá átjándu öld [Skúli fógeti = the Crown’s chief financial administrator; Reykjavík’s father. A story from the eighteenth century] (Reykjavík: JPV útgáfa, 2018). 256 pp. https://septentrio.uit.no/index.php/1700/article/view/4896 Andri M. Kristjánsson Copyright (c) 2019 Andri M. Kristjánsson http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ 2019-11-18 2019-11-18 16 167–169 167–169 10.7557/4.4896