Reformation, Mikael Agricola, and the Birth of the Finnish Literary Language

Emneord (Nøkkelord): Finsk, Mikael Agricola, Paulus Juusten, reformasjonen, oversettelse

Sammendrag

This article revisits the traditional history of the birth of the Finnish literary language in the aftermath of the Lutheran Reformation in the first half of the 16th century. Contrary to what earlier scholars have assumed, the article argues that the creation of the Finnish literary language cannot be attributed exclusively to the Bishop of Turku, Mikael Agricola, who is known as “the father of the Finnish literary language” because he published the first printed books in Finnish. The article will show that although the first Finnish publications were printed in the name of the Bishop of Turku, they were based on the translations of more authors. The article will also propose answers to the question, who these until now unknown authors could have been. The article is based on the study of relevant contemporary historical source material and close linguistic analysis of the early translations of ecclesiastical texts into Finnish.

Forfatterbiografier

Kaisa Häkkinen, University of Turku

Kaisa Häkkinen is professor emerita of Finnish at the University of Turku. Her areas of expertise are the history of Finnish and the Finno-Ugric languages, etymology and old literary Finnish.

Kirsi Salonen, University of Turku

Kirsi Salonen is professor of European and world history at the University of Turku. She is specialist of late medieval and Reformation period ecclesiastical history and of the Finnish Reformation.

Tanja Toropainen, University of Turku

Tanja Toropainen is teacher in Finnish language at the University of Turku. She is specialist of historical lexicology and old literary Finnish.

Publisert
2019-11-04
Hvordan referere
Häkkinen, Kaisa, Kirsi Salonen, og Tanja Toropainen. 2019. «Reformation, Mikael Agricola, and the Birth of the Finnish Literary Language». Nordlit, nr. 43 (november), 87–101. https://doi.org/10.7557/13.4961.